Can dogs eat chocolate ice cream? – Pet Dog Owner

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What’s your favorite dessert? Do you prefer a slice of carrot cake or maybe some freshly baked apple pie? Others may be more into pudding or crepes filled with fruit.

On a summer day, nothing hits the spot quite like ice cream. Chocolate ice cream, in particular, is a favorite treat among kids and adults alike. It could very well be your favorite dessert as well.

A lot of pet owners like to share their favorite foods with their furry companions. You may be thinking of sharing your bowl of chocolate ice cream with your dog, but is that a good idea?

Continue with this article to find out what could happen if you give your pet dog chocolate ice cream. Find out if it’s something you can do or something that must be avoided at all costs.

Can Dogs Eat Chocolate Ice Cream?

Not everything we eat is safe for our pets. That means you cannot share everything you enjoy with them.

Chocolate is probably the best example of a popular treat that dogs cannot enjoy. What many may not know is that ice cream can be bad for dogs too. Combine them and you have something that can put your pet’s life in danger.

Let’s discuss why those two treats are harmful to dogs. We can start by focusing on chocolate first.

Why Chocolate Is Bad for Dogs

Many pet owners are already aware that chocolate is a toxic substance for dogs. Still, some may not be fully aware of why that’s the case.

Chocolate is harmful to dogs because of two specific substances. Those are caffeine and theobromine.

Dogs cannot properly digest those substances. Unfortunately, indigestion is the least of your worries if your dog somehow ate chocolate.

They may also fall ill from consuming chocolate. Some cases of chocolate poisoning are so severe that they can even prove fatal.

Why Ice Cream Is Bad for Dogs

Giving your dog chocolate under any circumstances is a bad idea. That’s something all pet owners need to keep in mind.

But, what about ice cream? Is that a treat you can share with your dog?

Ice cream is not as bad for dogs as chocolate is, but you should still avoid offering it to your pet.

The first issue with ice cream is that it’s typically a dairy product. Dogs are usually lactose intolerant so a dairy product like ice cream can wreak havoc on their digestive system.

You also have to worry about the ingredients used in the ice cream. There may be some ingredients in there that are actively harmful to dogs such as artificial sweeteners. it’s best to just steer clear of giving your dog any ice cream so you can avoid those potential problems.

What Happens if Your Dog Licks Chocolate Ice Cream?

Eating any amount of chocolate ice cream can spell trouble for dogs. Not long after licking the ice cream, your dog may suffer from the effects of chocolate poisoning.

The first symptoms that may appear are diarrhea and vomiting. Your dog may cause a mess inside your home as their body attempts to fight off the toxins in the chocolate ice cream.

Your dog may also grow restless and their breathing may speed up. Place your hand on their body and you may feel that they are warmer than normal.

In bad cases, a dog may start to suffer from seizures due to chocolate poisoning. Fail to take action in time and you may also lose your beloved pet.

What to Do if My Dog Licks or Eats Chocolate Ice Cream?

Act as soon as possible if your pet dog has consumed chocolate ice cream. It doesn’t matter how much of the chocolate ice cream they ate. You need to bring them to the veterinarian so they can receive emergency care.

If possible, you should also look for the ice cream’s packaging and take it with you. The veterinarian can treat your dog more effectively if they know exactly what your pet consumed. The ingredients listed on the packaging will help guide your veterinarian.

While at the veterinary clinic, your dog may be given IV fluids to combat the effects of diarrhea and vomiting. Additional treatment will also be provided so the impact of the caffeine and theobromine in the chocolate ice cream can be minimized.

How Much Chocolate Ice Cream Is Too Much for Dogs?

Any amount of chocolate ice cream is dangerous for dogs. There is never any situation where it is acceptable to give your dog any amount of chocolate.

Still, the severity of your dog’s chocolate poisoning will differ based on the amount they ingested and the specific type of chocolate used in the ice cream. That’s because the amount of theobromine in the ice cream can also vary.

Dark chocolate is especially harmful to our canine companions. A single ounce of dark chocolate may contain up to 450 mg of theobromine. Since 20 mg of theobromine is already enough to endanger a dog’s life, you can imagine just how deadly dark chocolate ice cream can be.

Meanwhile, milk chocolate ice cream contains around 58 mg of theobromine per ounce. It’s not as toxic to dogs as dark chocolate is, but it remains a serious threat.

White chocolate is the least worrisome because it only contains 0.25 mg of theobromine per ounce. That said, there is still no good reason for you to give your dog white chocolate ice cream. Resist their request no matter how much they plead.

Is One Lick of Chocolate Ice Cream Too Much for Dogs?

Giving your dog a lick of your chocolate ice cream will not turn out well. A small amount of chocolate ice cream is already enough to seriously harm your dog.

Even if your dog somehow only eats a minuscule amount of chocolate ice cream, they may still fall ill. They may experience bouts of vomiting and diarrhea over the next few days due to the harmful substances that have entered their body.

Avoid eating chocolate ice cream around your dog to prevent any accidents. Considering the damage even a small amount of chocolate can do, there’s no such thing as being too cautious.

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